Review: Crobar*

Back in December, during an unusually productive period I think they call the Christmas holidays, I discovered an incredible opportunity. So I applied. After all, what is a blogger to do when faced with a great opportunity? And guess what! I was accepted to review the latest addition to the free-from health food section, Crobars!
So what exactly is a Crobar? It's very similar to most other gluten-free nut and fruit bars, made with cashews, dried fruit and seeds. Oh and one extra ingredient, cricket flour.

So what exactly is a Crobar? It’s very similar to most other gluten-free nut and fruit bars, made with cashews, dried fruit and seeds. Oh and one extra ingredient, cricket flour.

Hang on a moment! Cricket Flour?

Yep, you read that right. 6% of a cacao-flavoured Crobar is cricket flour.

So what is cricket flour?

Basically it is a ground powder made from roasted whole crickets. I know, it sounds really appetising.  However, when you combine it with dried fruit, nuts, seeds and a good pinch of something chocolatey (cacao powder), it turns into something that looks nothing like a cricket. In fact it looks like, well, a fruit and nut bar. And that is a lot less scary to eat than something which looks like it should be jumping between blades of grass.

But the best part about cricket flour isn’t that it’s practically unrecognisable. The benefits it has for both the earth and humans are pretty incredible. Yes, I present to you the first health bar that will keep environmentalists and body builders alike happy! (I never thought it would happen.) So here are a few facts from Gathrfoods, the brains behind Crobar:

  • They contain as much protein as beef (60g per 100g) but require 12 times less food and live on less land.
  • Crickets contain all nine essential amino acids, various nutrients and high levels of vitamin B12.
  • They are less likely to pass on diseases and can be grown organically, with less pesticides.
So what is cricket flour?   Basically it is a ground powder made from roasted whole crickets. I know, it sounds really appetising.  However, when you combine it with dried fruit, nuts, seeds and a good pinch of something chocolatey (cacao powder), it turns into something that looks nothing like a cricket. In fact it looks like, well, a fruit and nut bar. And that is a lot less scary to eat than something which looks like it should be jumping between blades of grass.
Now on to the important question… what does it taste like? Well, I’ve never had smoked chocolate but if I did ever come across it, I would expect it to taste something like a cacao Crobar. I know that sounds very weird but to be honest it’s no stranger than most Nakd bars, which is probably the closest comparison. Occasionally, something tart would pop up, which I suspect comes from the cranberries. I would say it is the savoury fan’s choice in the ever-widening range of fruit and nut bars. The smokey chocolate taste definitely sits it in a more savoury category.
There is just one more thing I want to tell you about crickets. While Old Testament food laws are famous for prohibiting the enjoyment of bacon and sausages, they were okay with the Hebrews enjoying a cricket or two.

‘All the winged insects that walk on all fours are detestable to you. Yet these you may eat among all the winged insects which walk on all fours: those which have above their feet jointed legs with which to jump on the earth. These of them you may eat: the locust in its kinds, and the devastating locust in its kinds, and the cricket in its kinds, and the grasshopper in its kinds. But all other winged insects which are four-footed are detestable to you.

So not only are Crobars good for you and the planet, they would have been a fantastic food for the Hebrews while spending 40 years in the desert. Facts like this do make me wonder just how ahead of the curve the Bible is and what else we are missing out on.
If you have tried a Crobar or cricket flour, why not tell me about it in the comments below. And if you haven’t tried one yet, why not pop over to Gathrfoods to check out the range.
xxx
The post Review: Crobar* first appeared on CounterCultural. CounterCouture.

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